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The Australian Optical Society

Australian Optical Society Awards

The Australian Optical Society offers several prizes in recognition of members' achievements:

The closing date for each prize application or nomination is March 31 each year. All applications and nominations are to be forwarded to the AOS Secretary.

AOS W.H. (Beattie) Steel Medal

The Australian Optical Society is seeking nominations for the next award of this medal, which is for an outstanding contribution or contributions to the field of optics in Australia or New Zealand by a member of the Australian Optical Society.

This Medal is the most prestigious award of the Australian Optical Society. It would normally be presented only to a nominee at an advanced stage of his or her professional career and with a strong and sustained record of authority, enterprise and innovation in the field of optics in Australia or New Zealand. Previous winners of the medal are listed below:

2013:
Professor John Harvey
The University of Auckland
2012:
Professor Barry Luther-Davies
The Australian National University
2011:
Professor Min Gu
Swinburne University
2010:
Professor Han Bachor
The Australian National University
2009:
Professor John Love
The Australian National University
2008:
Mr Achim Leistner
CSIRO
2007:
Professor Kenneth Baldwin
The Australian National University
2005:
Professor Brian Orr
Macquarie University
2004:
Professor Ross McPhedran
University of Sydney
1999:
Professor Dan Walls
University of Auckland
1997:
Professor Jim Piper
Macquarie University
1996:
Dr Parameswaran Hariharan
University of Sydney and CSIRO
1995:
Mr Bill James
James Optics, Melbourne

Nominations for the next AOS Medal should include brief personal details and a curriculum vitae emphasising the main contributions made by the nominee to Australian optics. Two letters of recommendation should also be provided. Nominations may be made either by or on behalf of any eligible candidate. The selection panel reserves the option to seek additional information about candidates for the award.

It is hoped that the person selected to receive the medal will be able to do so at the next AOS Conference.

The closing date for nominations is 31 March each year. Nominations should be sent to the Secretary.

The AOS Geoff Opat Early Career Researchers Prize

This Prize recognizes an outstanding early career researcher for her/his contribution to the field of optics. The prize is $1500, awarded annually, and includes an invitation to give an extended presentation at the annual AOS conference. The winner of this prize will also write an article for AOS News.

An application consists of a one-page description of the researcher's career and research since completing their PhD. The one-page description should present the research in an accessible way to readers within optics, but outside the specific area of the applicant, and should convey the researcher’s approach to her/his research, rather than simply providing a list of achievements. A list of the applicant’s refereed journal or conference publications in the past 5 years should be attached separately. Publications must be accepted, not just submitted, and must include acceptance dates for any not yet published. Two confidential references are required for each application, one from the direct supervisor and one from an individual familiar with the applicant’s research, but outside the applicant’s institution. In each reference, the referees are asked to address the criteria for the award listed below. (Applicants should provide contact details for the referees in their applications, and request that the referees send their references directly to the AOS Secretary.)

The Prize is judged by a committee appointed by the AOS Council. Applicants must be members of AOS. The winner of the prize would be expected to present a talk at the AOS meeting at the end of that year. The award need not be made in a given year, if the Prize Committee so chooses.

Criteria for the award

*Early Career Researchers are defined for this purpose as being within 5 years of completion of their PhD (as defined by graduation date). If there are reasons for a career delay (such as family responsibilities) then these should be explained in an addendum to the application, and certified by an appropriate person such as the direct supervisor.

Previous winners of the AOS Geoff Opat Early Career Researcher Prize are:

2013:
Dr Igor Aharonovich
The University of Technology Sydney
2012:
Dr Nathan Langford
The University of Queensland
2011:
Dr Thomas White
The University of Sydney
2010:
Dr Alexander Argyros
The University of Sydney
2009:
Dr Ilya Shadrivov
The Australian National University

AOS Postgraduate Student Prize

The Australian Optical Society wishes to encourage participation in national and international conferences by high-quality postgraduate students, and thus the Society has instituted the Australian Optical Society Prograduate Student Prize, which is a grant for conference travel valued upto $1500. Up to one award will be made in each year.

Previous winners of the Prize have been:

2013:
Michael Taylor
The University of Queensland
2011:
Robert Williams
Macquarie University
2010:
Sebastian Saliba
University of Melbourne
2009:
Stephen Christopher Warren-Smith
University of Adelaide
2008:
Michael Jones
Queensland University of Technology
2007:
Felicity Cox
University of Sydney
2006:
Kristy C. Vernon
QUT
2005:
Aidan Brooks
Adelaide University
2004:
Ilya Shadrivov
Australian National University
and
Thomas White
CUDOS, Sydney University
2003:
Joseph Hope
Australian National University
2002:
Luke Maquire
School of Physics, University of Melbourne
2001:
Winfried Hensinger
Physics, University of Queensland
2000:
Saiedeh Saghafi
Macquarie University
1999:
Daniel Day
Optoelectronic Imaging Group, Victoria University
1998:
Marlies Fiese
University of Queensland
and
Justin Blows
Macquarie University
1997:
Tanyo Monro
School of Physics, University of Sydney
1995:
David Balaic
School of Physics, University of Melbourne
1994:
Howard Wiseman
School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Queensland
1993:
Duncan Butler
School of Physics, University of Melbourne

An applicant and his/her supervisor must be: (1) a member of the Australian Optical Society, (2) enrolled in a postgraduate research degree, with a project in an optically related area. (If there is more that one supervisor, at least one must be a member of the AOS.) Non-members of the AOS may join the Society concurrently with their application for the prize. (Application forms are available in AOS News, or may be obtained from the Treasurer or Secretary). The prize cannot be awarded more than once to any individual.

An applicant must be sufficiently advanced in the research project to have obtained significant results in optics or a related area, such that those results are suitable for presentation at a proposed conference that falls in the twelve month period commencing 1 December. It is expected that the presentation at the proposed conference would take the form of a research paper, invited or contributed, oral or poster. The successful applicant will be expected to write a summary of the conference for AOS News.

Preference will be given in the selection procedures to applicants who intend to use the prize to attend and present their research results at a major conference outside Australia and New Zealand.

It is not essential that the results to be presented should already have been accepted for presentation at the proposed conference at the time of application, but no payment of the prize will be made until evidence of such acceptance is provided to the Society. Applicants are encouraged to provide tangible evidence of the results likely to be presented at the proposed conference (for example, in the form of an outline of a paper that has been accepted or submitted or is being prepared for that conference) and to make clear the benefits that would arise from their attendance at that conference.

The AOS award is not intended to cover the full cost of the applicant's attendance at the proposed conference. Wherever possible, applicants should identify means by which their research group and/or institution is likely to make a substantial contribution to their travel costs. Evidence of any such supplementary support should be provided (for example, by an undertaking in the supervisor's letter of recommendation). However, students with no identifiable supplementary travel support will not be disadvantaged in the selection process.

Since the research supervisor's report is a major factor in the assessment process, supervisors should be prepared to rank their students against the selection criteria if contacted by the selection committee.

Application Details

AOS Technical Optics Award

This award recognises those who have made a significant achievement in technical optics, not necessarily in a manner manifested by an extensive academic record or a traditional academic reputation. The work for which the award is made must have been carried out principally in Australia or New Zealand.

Applications are encouraged from, but not restricted to, young optical workers.

The winner will receive a prize consisting of $300 cash, one year's free membership of AOS, and an invitation to attend the AOS conference and make an oral presentation of his or her work.

Previous winners of the Prize have been:

2010:
Dr Katie Green
CSIRO
2004:
Dr Yabai He
Macquarie University
2000:
Alex Boiko
1997:
Chris Freund
CSIRO Telecommunications and Industrial Physics.
1995:
Mr Ron Bulla
CSIRO Applied Physics

Nominations are now invited from (or on behalf of) suitable candidates, which will be presented at the next AOS Conference.

AOS Warsash Science Communication Prize in Optics

This Prize is open to AOS student members whose Honours, Masters or PhD research work has been accepted for publication in a refereed journal in the past year. The Prize may only be awarded once to any individual.

A submission consists of a 300-word summary of the published research, written in the style of a New Scientist article or similar, explaining the significance of the applicant’s research project to a casual reader outside the field. The submission may include up to 2 figures which may be in colour or black and white, and should also include a copy of the published research paper(s) with evidence that it is accepted for publication. Applicants should provide a short statement explaining their contribution to the published paper, signed by the applicant and her/his supervisor.

Applicants must agree that their submissions may be published in AOS News at the discretion of the AOS News Editor, and/or placed on the AOS Website, with author and institution attribution.

Prize is judged by a committee appointed by the AOS council, which includes a representative of Warsash.

Criteria for the award of the Prize are:

The $500 Prize is sponsored by Warsash Scientific Pty Ltd.

Previous winners of the Warsash Science Communication Prize in Optics are:

2013:
Matt Collins
University of Sydney
2010:
Elaine Miles
University of Melbourne
2005:
Vijan Sivan
RMIT